everything evil

awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.
awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape. 
as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.” 
adds aljkhbeer, "there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 
for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  
but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.

awkwardsituationist:

these photos were taken by mohammed salem and klaus thymann (click pic), showing the rise of parkour in gaza’s shati and khan yunis refugee camps. unemployment in the camps is high, and with little to do and limited resources, some have turned to parkour as a means of escape.

as abdullah enshasy, who cofounded gaza parkour team with mohammed aljkhbeer, explains, “i have witnessed war, invasion and killing. when i was a kid and i saw these things, blood and injuries, i didn’t know what it all meant.”

adds aljkhbeer"there is a big relationship between parkour and barriers that we’re surrounded by in the gaza strip. there’s the blockade, walls are everywhere. …parkour gives us a sense of freedom and allows us to endure these conditions without getting deeply depressed.” 

for a sport that is literally about overcoming obstacles and living beyond imposed physical restraints, parkour has perhaps even greater resonance in the narrow, politically and militarily confined gaza strip, which is home to a densely boxed in population of 1.7 million palestinians.  

but enshasy notes, “at first people didn’t accept us. they would say, ‘you jump like monkeys and you climb buildings like thieves’.” but as their facebook page explains, parkour is about breaking from conventional paths in life and finding your own.


premierbonheur:

The amazing Kathleen Doyle of Curves Illustrated was kind enough to feature me on her blog! You can commission her here or buy from her etsy! She’s fantastic!!
Right now she’s also doing a giveaway!:
“Curvy Girl Chronicles and I are having a giveaway! You can win a custom watercolour illustration of YOU by following Curvy Girl Chronicles and Curvy Sketches on Instagram, and posting a photo of what you would like to be illustrated. Make sure to use the hashtag #CurvyChroniclesSketch when posting your photo! I’m so excited to see everyone’s submissions. The contest is only open until Aug 31 so hurry up and enter!”
Please don’t remove the credits if you reblog :)
premierbonheur:

The amazing Kathleen Doyle of Curves Illustrated was kind enough to feature me on her blog! You can commission her here or buy from her etsy! She’s fantastic!!
Right now she’s also doing a giveaway!:
“Curvy Girl Chronicles and I are having a giveaway! You can win a custom watercolour illustration of YOU by following Curvy Girl Chronicles and Curvy Sketches on Instagram, and posting a photo of what you would like to be illustrated. Make sure to use the hashtag #CurvyChroniclesSketch when posting your photo! I’m so excited to see everyone’s submissions. The contest is only open until Aug 31 so hurry up and enter!”
Please don’t remove the credits if you reblog :)
premierbonheur:

The amazing Kathleen Doyle of Curves Illustrated was kind enough to feature me on her blog! You can commission her here or buy from her etsy! She’s fantastic!!
Right now she’s also doing a giveaway!:
“Curvy Girl Chronicles and I are having a giveaway! You can win a custom watercolour illustration of YOU by following Curvy Girl Chronicles and Curvy Sketches on Instagram, and posting a photo of what you would like to be illustrated. Make sure to use the hashtag #CurvyChroniclesSketch when posting your photo! I’m so excited to see everyone’s submissions. The contest is only open until Aug 31 so hurry up and enter!”
Please don’t remove the credits if you reblog :)

premierbonheur:

The amazing Kathleen Doyle of Curves Illustrated was kind enough to feature me on her blog! You can commission her here or buy from her etsy! She’s fantastic!!

Right now she’s also doing a giveaway!:

Curvy Girl Chronicles and I are having a giveaway! You can win a custom watercolour illustration of YOU by following Curvy Girl Chronicles and Curvy Sketches on Instagram, and posting a photo of what you would like to be illustrated. Make sure to use the hashtag #CurvyChroniclesSketch when posting your photo! I’m so excited to see everyone’s submissions. The contest is only open until Aug 31 so hurry up and enter!”

Please don’t remove the credits if you reblog :)


haialyy:

backtobellatrixblack:

Remus and Harry make me so sad. Think about the first time Harry met Remus, on the Hogwarts Express. Remus is staring at this teenager, this boy that is so painfully Lily and James’ son. In another life he would have been ‘Uncle Remus’, swinging by every Sunday for supper, babysitting Harry with Sirius. Instead he’s a complete stranger.

RIGHT IN THE HEART


bands-savedme:

sparkhy:

acnemint:

br0ken-daisy:

so for my art project we had to fake a death/murder. for mine I did someone who had jumped off a building. when I was laying down while the picture was being taken, 7 people came running up to me asking if I was okay and if I needed an ambulance etc. I’ve been suicidal for a very long time, and the thoughts of jumping off buildings and ending my life have gone through my mind a thousand times. But the fact that people actually stopped and came running over to see if I was alright made me see that people do care, strangers care. so many people looked and walked past, but these 7 people some how took these suicidal feelings away… weird huh? But the moral of this story is that people do care about you, even people who don’t know who you are.



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bands-savedme:

sparkhy:

acnemint:

br0ken-daisy:

so for my art project we had to fake a death/murder. for mine I did someone who had jumped off a building. when I was laying down while the picture was being taken, 7 people came running up to me asking if I was okay and if I needed an ambulance etc. I’ve been suicidal for a very long time, and the thoughts of jumping off buildings and ending my life have gone through my mind a thousand times. But the fact that people actually stopped and came running over to see if I was alright made me see that people do care, strangers care. so many people looked and walked past, but these 7 people some how took these suicidal feelings away… weird huh? But the moral of this story is that people do care about you, even people who don’t know who you are.

(Source: internetgirl666)